I see more glass

Movies, books, music, and all the arts go here.
Give us your recommendations and reviews.

I see more glass

Postby Long Run » Mon Aug 12, 2019 8:36 pm

Long-hidden J.D. Salinger manuscripts coming to bookstore near you -- but you have to be patient

* * *

After rocketing to literary fame in 1951 with “The Catcher in the Rye,” J.D. Salinger stopped publishing in 1965 and all but disappeared. His retreat made him even more of an object of fascination than he had been before. He died in 2010 at 91, following nearly 50 years of public silence.

Rumors have circulated for decades that Salinger had completed multiple manuscripts and stashed them away in his rural New Hampshire home. But in the years immediately following his death, his estate offered not a hint.

Now his son Matt Salinger, worried that his father’s legacy could be falling away, has made a tantalizing admission: There are indeed never-publicly-seen J.D. Salinger manuscripts -- and they will be making it to bookstores in the years ahead.

The younger Salinger says that even though his father did once say “publishing is a terrible invasion of my privacy,” the author always did intend to eventually put his later, unseen work out into the world.

Late in J.D. Salinger’s life, his son told The New York Times, he’d often say, “ ‘This is the year, I’m getting things together,’ and then when it came time to do it, he just couldn’t do it. It took too much out of him, the attention was too great.”

So in the years since his father’s death, Matt Salinger has been working his way through the unpublished writing. He admits it’s a slow process. “Everything’s a rabbit hole,” he said.

He says the manuscripts should start to be published in about five years. In the meantime, he has green-lit digital versions of Salinger’s already published works, something his anti-internet father opposed.

One big problem Matt Salinger has faced: Much of the unpublished work was written by hand, and the younger Salinger has been disappointed in the performance of software that scans paper pages and converts them into digital files. So he’s typing the manuscripts into a computer himself, page by page. (He won’t say how many different books there are, offering only that some of the work does continue the stories of the Glass family from Salinger’s “Franny and Zooey” and “Raise High the Roof Beam, Carpenters and Seymour: An Introduction.”)

All this transcribing is hardly glamorous work for the former actor, but Matt Salinger nevertheless has found it rewarding. “It’s kept him very much alive for me,” he said. “It’s been fascinating and joyful and moving and sad.”

-- Douglas Perry
User avatar
Long Run
 
Posts: 5182
Joined: Sat Apr 17, 2010 2:47 pm

Re: I see more glass

Postby ex-khobar Andy » Tue Aug 13, 2019 12:01 am

Why does Harper Lee spring to mind? Like so many others, I bought "To Set a Watchman" and I didn't finish it. Unreadable, in my view. There was a good reason she didn't publish it: it was, in her considered opinion, junk. And yet others made money off it.

I am also reminded of Neil Armstrong's sons who (a) sued the hospital who allegedly screwed up their dad's artery bypass and, in effect (and I should state for the record that this is my opinion) shook them down and (b) sold their father's mementoes.

Kids these days . . .
ex-khobar Andy
 
Posts: 1998
Joined: Sat Dec 19, 2015 4:16 am
Location: Louisville KY as of July 2018

Re: I see more glass

Postby BoSoxGal » Tue Aug 13, 2019 12:25 am

I'm sorry, but you absolutely cannot know that Harper Lee considered Go Set a Watchman to be 'junk' - and it most certainly is not. Further, I'd be surprised if most folks here - you included - were capable of writing anything so 'unreadable'. :roll:

https://www.theguardian.com/books/ng-interactive/2015/jul/10/go-set-a-watchman-read-the-first-chapter

The novel is more complex and less inherently pleasing than TKAM, but it has much value in reflecting truths about the South that Lee grew up in and lived in for the majority of her adult life. I found the revelations about Atticus Finch rang very true, as did the dynamic of a daughter come to see her father through the lens of maturity rather than childish idealism.

eta: Here's a comment from a Guardian article about GSAW that expresses how I feel about it better than I ever could:

Clearly Watchman is not the quality of Mockingbird. If Lee had made some effort with the editors advice to reorganize Watchmen, it may have been much better. However, no matter how well written Watchman could have been, it would never have been the literary success that Mockingbird is because, Watchman tells the story of how we are and Mockingbird tells the story of how we want to be.
@realDonaldTrump, your mouth is the foulest shithole in the world! ~ Vicente Fox Quesada
User avatar
BoSoxGal
 
Posts: 11763
Joined: Tue Apr 06, 2010 10:36 pm
Location: The Heart of Red Sox Nation

Re: I see more glass

Postby ex-khobar Andy » Tue Aug 13, 2019 4:28 am

You're right of course: I cannot know what Harper Lee actually thought of the novel. So we have to go by the evidence. Fact: it was never published - or at least not until she was in a wheelchair, almost deaf and blind, and - at least according to some - with few of her faculties remaining. GSAW was heavily reworked into TKAM. You don't rework something you are proud of and want to survive intact.

I have no high opinion of my own writing ability so I can only concur with your second sentence.

I recall reading a review of it in WaPo before I bought it. It's possible that the review colored the reading experience. Unfortunately I have read my pieces for the month but there is this convenient excerpt from Wikipedia:

Alexandra Petri wrote in The Washington Post, "It is an inchoate jumble ... Go Set a Watchman is not, by any stretch of the imagination, a good, or even a finished book. For the first 100 pages it lacks anything that could even charitably be described as a plot. ... [T]he writing is laughably bad. ... I flung the book down and groaned audibly and I almost did not pick it back up even though I knew I had fewer than 100 pages to go. ... This should not have been published. It’s 280 pages in desperate need of an editor. ... If you were anywhere in the vicinity of me when I was reading the thing, you heard a horrible bellowing noise, followed by the sound of a book being angrily tossed down.


Clearly you disagree with me and if you enjoyed the book, you obviously found stuff that I missed. Perhaps had I persisted (The English Patient and Catch-22 are two books I can recall which were lost on me first time around but well worth it on the second attempt*) I might have found more. For now I share Ms Petri's opinion.

* Joseph Conrad's Nostromo is another.

PS:

. . . as did the dynamic of a daughter come to see her father through the lens of maturity rather than childish idealism.


I think the whole point of TKAM is that Scout Finch IS seeing the events of 1930s Maycomb through the lens of maturity.
ex-khobar Andy
 
Posts: 1998
Joined: Sat Dec 19, 2015 4:16 am
Location: Louisville KY as of July 2018

Re: I see more glass

Postby BoSoxGal » Tue Aug 13, 2019 6:12 am

TKAM is universally acclaimed for its depiction of a child’s innocent view of race, prejudice and justice in the South.

The Petri review is a joke; in her whole life she’s never written anything nearly as lovely as Harper Lee’s prose in GSAW, I suspect - I had to look her up https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alexandra_Petri and find she’s nobody whose opinion I would seek out on literary matters despite her being a former English major. There is no universe in which the writing in GSAW is fairly assessed as ‘laughably bad’; I believe this critic (like many others) was determined to loathe the novel no matter how good it was, and I believe Harper Lee suspected the same and it was one reason she refused to publish anything else after TKAM until she was so old she wouldn’t have to long suffer the slings and arrows of the nasty critics. If you look, you’ll find that while nobody asserts GSAW is the equal of TKAM, there are many critics who have praised the book for its insights into Lee’s creative process and on its own merits.

There have been a number of pieces written which refute the idea promoted by some that Harper Lee was somehow coerced by her attorney into publishing GSAW or that she was incompetent and incapable of making an informed decision about it; I found the refutations to be compelling. As The New York Times reported: “The controversy surrounding “Watchman” divided Ms. Lee’s hometown, pitting some of her longtime friends and acquaintances, who doubted she had approved of the publication, against Ms. Lee’s lawyer, agent and publisher, generating the kind of public spectacle Ms. Lee abhorred. But an Alabama agency investigated whether Ms. Lee was a victim of elder abuse and financial fraud and determined that no abuse had occurred.” That quote puts things in far from the best light - if you look at the numerous pieces on the controversy, you’ll see repeatedly that many who knew her believed her to be entirely competent in making the decision to publish and also point to the fact that her attorney was a woman first mentored in her teens by Harper’s sister Alice and who had been close to the sisters for decades - she wasn’t some come lately interloper taking advantage of Lee. Of particular note is the fact that none of her 4 nieces/nephews has ever raised any concern that she was coerced in this manner - the criticisms all come from outside the family and many from literary critics who never met the woman. Anyway, in the absence of a specific prohibition in her LW&T, the executor of her estate could have published it anyway after her death as in the best fiduciary interests of the estate - not unlike the decision made by Matt Salinger.

https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.nytimes.com/2018/02/27/books/harper-lee-will.amp.html

Did you know that Franz Kafka died leaving his greatest works unpublished, and with a specific direction to his friend and executor Max Brod to destroy all his unpublished manuscripts? Brod refused that direction which was a blessing to the world. Imagine not having The Trial in the canon of world literature?!
Last edited by BoSoxGal on Tue Aug 13, 2019 6:33 am, edited 3 times in total.
@realDonaldTrump, your mouth is the foulest shithole in the world! ~ Vicente Fox Quesada
User avatar
BoSoxGal
 
Posts: 11763
Joined: Tue Apr 06, 2010 10:36 pm
Location: The Heart of Red Sox Nation

Re: I see more glass

Postby BoSoxGal » Tue Aug 13, 2019 6:19 am

One final note - as someone who works daily with the elderly and infirm, I find your assertion that being deaf, blind and wheelchair bound somehow automatically equates to incompetence to be frankly reprehensible. I’ve worked with 98 year old clients who couldn’t walk but were sharper tacks than me and you. My recent client was blind from her teens but was offered a full ride scholarship to Tufts University based on merit only. I’m getting pretty hard of hearing myself these days but it has had no effect on my intelligence and ability to make decisions regarding my own wellbeing.

I really hope that characterization was just a major blunder and not indicative of how you actually see the diffently-abled and the elderly among us.
@realDonaldTrump, your mouth is the foulest shithole in the world! ~ Vicente Fox Quesada
User avatar
BoSoxGal
 
Posts: 11763
Joined: Tue Apr 06, 2010 10:36 pm
Location: The Heart of Red Sox Nation

Re: I see more glass

Postby ex-khobar Andy » Tue Aug 13, 2019 11:45 am

We can agree to disagree on the merits of the novel BSG but a few points:

TKAM is universally acclaimed for its depiction of a child’s innocent view of race, prejudice and justice in the South. Its depiction, yes: by that same child, now all grown up, who is using the 'lens of maturity', as you put it.


The Petri review is a joke; in her whole life she’s never written anything nearly as lovely as Harper Lee’s prose in GSAW, I suspect - I had to look her up https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alexandra_Petri and find she’s nobody whose opinion I would seek out on literary matters despite her being a former English major. Wow. There's a lot packed into a sentence there. Having no recollection of reading anything else by Ms Petrie, I can offer no opinion on the quality of her writings. But I frequently read, understand and even welcome the opinion of those who have no track record of accomplishment in the specific endeavor they are criticizing. For example I have been known to read and appreciate pieces on tennis or church architecture by some who would not last a second on court with Ms Navratilova or who have never placed one block of stone atop another. Or who might have an opinion on our current *president but who have never themselves won a high elected office. I really don't know what it is in her Wiki bio which leads you to believe that she would have no worthwhile opinion on literary matters. If you have something indicating that, let me know and I can put it in for you. I would need a secondary reference.

There is no universe in which the writing in GSAW is fairly assessed as ‘laughably bad’; I believe this critic (like many others) was determined to loathe the novel no matter how good it was, and I believe Harper Lee suspected the same and it was one reason she refused to publish anything else after TKAM Lee refused to publish TSAW because she was concerned about Ms Petri's opinion? That is news. until she was so old she wouldn’t have to long suffer the slings and arrows of the nasty critics. Actually that surprises me. I suspect (don't know) that Lee, as the author of one of the most universally beloved of books, had little personal experience of the 'slings and arrows' (nice Hamlet reference there, BSG) of nasty critics.If you look, you’ll find that while nobody asserts GSAW is the equal of TKAM I wonder why that is, there are many critics who have praised the book for its insights into Lee’s creative process !!! and on its own merits Indeed there are. There is a difference of opinion on the book's literary merits? We mustn't allow that.


There have been a number of pieces written which refute the idea promoted by some that Harper Lee was somehow coerced by her attorney into publishing GSAW or that she was incompetent and incapable of making an informed decision about it; I found the refutations to be compelling. As The New York Times reported: “The controversy surrounding “Watchman” divided Ms. Lee’s hometown, pitting some of her longtime friends and acquaintances, who doubted she had approved of the publication, against Ms. Lee’s lawyer, agent and publisher, generating the kind of public spectacle Ms. Lee abhorred. I know you're an attorney BSG and AFAIK a perfectly competent and honest one; but in a dispute between someone's 'longtime friends and acquaintances' and her 'lawyer, agent and publisher' think I'll generally side with the f&a against the 'lawyer, agent and publisher' (is that one person or three?? either way, he, she or they stand to benefit from the publication in a way that the f&a might not - follow the money, as Deep Throat said.) But an Alabama agency investigated whether Ms. Lee was a victim of elder abuse and financial fraud and determined that no abuse had occurred.” That quote puts things in far from the best light - if you look at the numerous pieces on the controversy, you’ll see repeatedly that many who knew her believed her to be entirely competent in making the decision to publish and also point to the fact that her attorney was a woman first mentored in her teens by Harper’s sister Alice and who had been close to the sisters for decades - she wasn’t some come lately interloper taking advantage of Lee. Of particular note is the fact that none of her 4 nieces/nephews has ever raised any concern that she was coerced in this manner - the criticisms all come from outside the family and many from literary critics who never met the woman. Anyway, in the absence of a specific prohibition in her LW&T, the executor of her estate could have published it anyway after her death as in the best fiduciary interests of the estate Publication of TSAW was undoubtedly in the 'best fiduciary interests of the estate' - you have me there - my doubt is that it was in the best interests of Ms Lee's literary reputation or indeed of literature itself - not unlike the decision made by Matt Salinger.

https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.nytime ... l.amp.html


Did you know that Franz Kafka died leaving his greatest works unpublished, and with a specific direction to his friend and executor Max Brod to destroy all his unpublished manuscripts? Brod refused that direction which was a blessing to the world. Imagine not having The Trial in the canon of world literature?! To coin a phrase: post hoc ergo propter hoc. I didn't know that about Kafka: But I have no clue what you are getting at. I am very pleased that Brod ignored his friend's request. I'm a little surprised to hear an attorney praising this, however: when I am dead and gone, I expect my attorney to obey my requests. That after all is what I pay him to do. If he doesn't I shall expect my heirs to sue the fucker.


I am most incensed about your sentence fragment in your second post:

I find your assertion that being deaf, blind and wheelchair bound somehow automatically equates to incompetence to be frankly reprehensible.
.

I DID NOT MAKE THAT ASSERTION. SORRY ABOUT THE SHOUTING BUT READ WHAT I WROTE AGAIN.

I wrote:

. . . in a wheelchair, almost deaf and blind, and - at least according to some - with few of her faculties remaining.


There is a little word 'and' in the middle there which absolutely goes against your statement that I believe that blindness, deafness or physical handicaps equates to 'incompetence' - that indeed would be reprehensible but I did not say, mean or even imply that this was the case. I even tempered that statement with 'at least according to some' because neither you nor I were there so we have to listen to (note: I did not say believe) those who were.

BSG - I don't, based on a few days a couple of years ago, share your opinion of the book. Because you so clearly like it, and because I sometimes share and even applaud your comments, when I next come across it (it's in a box in the basement along with several thousand other books I have to go through and separate into piles labelled 'keep', 'recycle/toss', 'donate to library' and 'sell) I shall probably put it aside and make a mental note to have another go at it on the grounds that BSG thinks it's worthwhile.
ex-khobar Andy
 
Posts: 1998
Joined: Sat Dec 19, 2015 4:16 am
Location: Louisville KY as of July 2018

Re: I see more glass

Postby BoSoxGal » Tue Aug 13, 2019 2:20 pm

You clearly want to ignore key facts and are determined to be in the camp of GSAW is evil and Lee was exploited - but I’m going to point them out one last time:

Law enforcement authorities investigated and found ZERO evidence that Lee was coerced or abused in ANY matter, much less the publication of the book. If you’d bothered to look at the NYT article I linked, you’d have seen that she SIGNED HER WILL IN THE PRESENCE OF WITNESSES just days before her death. SHE WAS NOT INCOMPETENT.

As I wrote (and you ignored) and as the article also details, her attorney Ms. Carter WAS A LONGTIME FRIEND - not just an attorney. You say you’ll take the opinion of her longtime friends and acquaintances over her attorney, yet you ignore that her attorney was a longtime friend and a mentee since teenagehood of her sister Alice, who was Lee’s fiercest protector. In addition, many longtime friends and acquaintances AND HER ENTIRE BLOOD FAMILY dispute the assertion that she was coerced in any way.

In not one but two posts you pointed to her age and infirmities as evidence that she wasn’t fit to make such a decision. I would settle for assuming that you don’t have a fucking clue what legal competence is based on, but since you were such a prick in that latest response, I’m going to settle for you got caught out for a Neanderthal perspective and now you’re shooting the messenger - well fuck you, you said it plain as day. Sorry but being elderly or physically infirm does not equate to being incompetent. Period.

As to the ‘literary critic’ you’re so passionately defending - yes, I do believe firmly that some literary critics have more authority than others because any idiot can have an opinion. I’m guessing you don’t have an advanced degree in literature as I do, and you aren’t aware of the epic struggle throughout history between artists and critics, particularly in the literary world. Many of the greatest works of literature in the canon of world literature were panned mercilessly by literary critics at the time of publication. Posting a review by an essentially unknown comedian with one book of comic essays under her belt is hardly defensive of your position, sorry. And you’ve clearly studied little about Harper Lee if you are scoffing at my assertion that she struggled with fears over how any other published work would be received after the experience of TKAM. As a very close friend of Truman Capote she was all too familiar with the world of literary critics particularly in NYC and she held much of it in contempt - which is why she returned to her little hometown and lived what the critics called a ‘reclusive’ life because they couldn’t believe she didn’t want to spend it rubbing shoulders with the so-called literary elite.
@realDonaldTrump, your mouth is the foulest shithole in the world! ~ Vicente Fox Quesada
User avatar
BoSoxGal
 
Posts: 11763
Joined: Tue Apr 06, 2010 10:36 pm
Location: The Heart of Red Sox Nation

Re: I see more glass

Postby ex-khobar Andy » Tue Aug 13, 2019 2:26 pm

Sorry but being elderly or physically infirm does not equate to being incompetent. Period.


I'll put this in words of one syllable so you can understand.

I did not say that. Read what I wrote, one more time. Please.
ex-khobar Andy
 
Posts: 1998
Joined: Sat Dec 19, 2015 4:16 am
Location: Louisville KY as of July 2018

Re: I see more glass

Postby MajGenl.Meade » Tue Aug 13, 2019 2:38 pm

I quite liked the first chapter and may have to get this from the library to see whether the book sustains interest or is as mildly disappointing as some people have found it to be.

Image
The world is full of shitty things that should never have happened. Look at Sean Hanitty.
"The Road to Little Dribbling" - Bill Bryson
User avatar
MajGenl.Meade
 
Posts: 15890
Joined: Sun Apr 25, 2010 8:51 am
Location: Bloemfontein

Re: I see more glass

Postby BoSoxGal » Tue Aug 13, 2019 2:39 pm

ex-khobar Andy wrote:You're right of course: I cannot know what Harper Lee actually thought of the novel. So we have to go by the evidence. Fact: it was never published - or at least not until she was in a wheelchair, almost deaf and blind, and - at least according to some - with few of her faculties remaining. GSAW was heavily reworked into TKAM. You don't rework something you are proud of and want to survive intact.

I have no high opinion of my own writing ability so I can only concur with your second sentence.

I recall reading a review of it in WaPo before I bought it. It's possible that the review colored the reading experience. Unfortunately I have read my pieces for the month but there is this convenient excerpt from Wikipedia:

Alexandra Petri wrote in The Washington Post, "It is an inchoate jumble ... Go Set a Watchman is not, by any stretch of the imagination, a good, or even a finished book. For the first 100 pages it lacks anything that could even charitably be described as a plot. ... [T]he writing is laughably bad. ... I flung the book down and groaned audibly and I almost did not pick it back up even though I knew I had fewer than 100 pages to go. ... This should not have been published. It’s 280 pages in desperate need of an editor. ... If you were anywhere in the vicinity of me when I was reading the thing, you heard a horrible bellowing noise, followed by the sound of a book being angrily tossed down.


Clearly you disagree with me and if you enjoyed the book, you obviously found stuff that I missed. Perhaps had I persisted (The English Patient and Catch-22 are two books I can recall which were lost on me first time around but well worth it on the second attempt*) I might have found more. For now I share Ms Petri's opinion.

* Joseph Conrad's Nostromo is another.

PS:

. . . as did the dynamic of a daughter come to see her father through the lens of maturity rather than childish idealism.


I think the whole point of TKAM is that Scout Finch IS seeing the events of 1930s Maycomb through the lens of maturity.
@realDonaldTrump, your mouth is the foulest shithole in the world! ~ Vicente Fox Quesada
User avatar
BoSoxGal
 
Posts: 11763
Joined: Tue Apr 06, 2010 10:36 pm
Location: The Heart of Red Sox Nation

Re: I see more glass

Postby BoSoxGal » Tue Aug 13, 2019 2:49 pm

ex-khobar Andy wrote:
Sorry but being elderly or physically infirm does not equate to being incompetent. Period.


I'll put this in words of one syllable so you can understand.

I did not say that. Read what I wrote, one more time. Please.


I read what you wrote, which is that you agree with some unnamed persons you don’t even know that she must’ve been incompetent because hey, she was deaf and blind and in a wheelchair.

Forget that the authorities (and do you really think with all the microscopic attention they weren’t extra careful) found upon investigating - which included interviewing Harper Lee; forget the many longtime friends and acquaintances and caregivers and her own fucking family who say she’s not incompetent; forget anything but the opinion you’ve formed based on other (unknown) people’s opinions and your own clear predilection to believe that an old and physically infirm person must be losing their mind along with perfect bladder function. :roll:

And guess what? You’re not the last word on what someone’s literary legacy should include. THAT PERSON IS. Lee wanted to publish the manuscript and many literary critics laud the insight into her creative process that a lesser work provides - many great authors have lesser works and those of us who study literature with some care cherish those works as part of the greater picture of an artist’s process. It is patently ridiculous to suggest that Harper Lee’s contribution to the canon of American literature has been in any way diminished by the publication of GSAW.

I’m done with this argument. You are wrong. Period.
@realDonaldTrump, your mouth is the foulest shithole in the world! ~ Vicente Fox Quesada
User avatar
BoSoxGal
 
Posts: 11763
Joined: Tue Apr 06, 2010 10:36 pm
Location: The Heart of Red Sox Nation

Re: I see more glass

Postby ex-khobar Andy » Tue Aug 13, 2019 3:58 pm

Is that Scylla or Charybdis Meade? - I can never remember which is which.

I'm not defending - passionately or otherwise - the WaPo's erstwhile literary critic. She may still be, I don't know. I do happen to agree with her opinion on one book. WaPo decided to give her (Petri - I hear she's a dish!) a gig which is more than they have done for me or anyone else on this board AFAIK.

On the subject of judging someone based on their other activities - she's not allowed to have an opinion on literature because she's a comedian - I guess you wouldn't like Russell Brand then - I think he has an asshole persona which seeps into his personhood from time to time but I wish I could write like him. Katy Perry liked him, apparently, FWIW.

You don't usually have such faith in law enforcement authorities, BSG. Lee's sister Alice, whom you reference, had a low opinion of her mentee - Tomja Carter, the attorney - and wrote a letter in 2011 that accused Carter of putting an unauthorized statement in front of 'poor Nelle' (Harper Lee's real name) to sign. Lee had previously said that she would never publish another novel - if she had one already which she thought highly of, why would she do that?

Of course we'll never know - none of us were there. The fact remains that I did not enjoy the 100 pages or so that I read; and I tend to believe that while it may well not have come to the definition of elder abuse, there were those around her who sought to make a few more $$ out of her than they already had. Harper Lee had an unsurpassed place in the affections of many readers. I think she may have jeopardized that with the issuance of GSAW; and it seems to me that she realized that and decided that it wasn't worth it. I may well be wrong which is why it's called an opinion.

Edited to correct a typo.
Last edited by ex-khobar Andy on Tue Aug 13, 2019 4:38 pm, edited 1 time in total.
ex-khobar Andy
 
Posts: 1998
Joined: Sat Dec 19, 2015 4:16 am
Location: Louisville KY as of July 2018

Re: I see more glass

Postby BoSoxGal » Tue Aug 13, 2019 4:16 pm

Okay, you’re right. All of Harper Lee’s family and friends and caregivers who claim she was competent to make decisions for herself including signing her own will a few days before her death (and years after publishing GSAW) and the probate court who handled her will are ALL corrupt evil motherfuckers who exploited an incompetent, deaf, blind and wheelchair bound person. You and Ms. Petri are the heroes of this story!


:roll:


And no, it’s not ‘of course we’ll never know’ - we know because dozens of people have investigated and THERE IS NO EVIDENCE to support your assertions. You just didn’t like the book and a lot of people like you who got their panties in a twist over a book they didn’t like have been attacking the author and everyone who actually knows and loves her who assert her competence and the social workers (not cops) who investigated and found ZERO MERIT to the allegations you are still perpetuating years later. That, in my opinion, is disgusting.
@realDonaldTrump, your mouth is the foulest shithole in the world! ~ Vicente Fox Quesada
User avatar
BoSoxGal
 
Posts: 11763
Joined: Tue Apr 06, 2010 10:36 pm
Location: The Heart of Red Sox Nation

Re: I see more glass

Postby MajGenl.Meade » Tue Aug 13, 2019 7:36 pm

ex-khobar Andy wrote:Is that Scylla or Charybdis Meade? - I can never remember which is which.


Both Andy. Wiki, she say: "Scylla and Charybdis were mythical sea monsters . . . Greek mythology sited them on opposite sides of the Strait of Messina between Sicily and the Italian mainland. Scylla was rationalized as a rock shoal (described as a six-headed sea monster) on the Italian side of the strait and Charybdis was a whirlpool off the coast of Sicily"

Or more Homerically, Scylla was a supernatural female creature, with 12 feet and 6 heads on long, snaky necks, each head having a triple row of shark-like teeth, while her loins were girdled by the heads of baying dogs...Charybdis, who lurked under a fig tree a bow-shot away on the opposite shore, drank down and belched forth the waters thrice a day and was fatal to shipping.
The world is full of shitty things that should never have happened. Look at Sean Hanitty.
"The Road to Little Dribbling" - Bill Bryson
User avatar
MajGenl.Meade
 
Posts: 15890
Joined: Sun Apr 25, 2010 8:51 am
Location: Bloemfontein

Re: I see more glass

Postby wesw » Wed Aug 14, 2019 12:29 am

you should n t assume that monosyllabism is understandable to the ..., er..., less endowed....

if you don t want to seem cruel and elitist you should only grunt and hit.
give me liberty or give me death.

patrick henry

(insert satirical cartoon of mohamet here)
User avatar
wesw
 
Posts: 8812
Joined: Thu Aug 21, 2014 1:24 am
Location: the eastern shore


Return to The Arts

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest