A local kid makes good

Cars, Bikes, Airplanes, "bicycles" spelled correctly, Tools and Toys.

A local kid makes good

Postby MGMcAnick » Sat May 04, 2019 3:58 pm

As a fan of aviation and aviation history, I think it's important to "keep 'em flying". The fact that this young man, in his late 30s, is now approved to be the pilot in command of Doc will go a long way toward keeping Doc in the air.

https://www.b29doc.com/b-29-doc-adds-to ... 4-45020069
A friend of Doc's.
User avatar
MGMcAnick
 
Posts: 734
Joined: Mon Sep 28, 2015 10:01 pm
Location: 12 NM from ICT @ 010º

Re: A local kid makes good

Postby Bicycle Bill » Sat May 04, 2019 7:49 pm

Nice article ... but makes me wonder how they did it in the war years for the four-engine heavy bombers like the B-17, B-24, and B-29.  You can't tell me EVERY command pilot in the 8th Air Force's 1000-plane raids was a grizzled old veteran with a couple thousand flight hours logged in the right-hand seat before moving over.

I suspect someone pointed at a likely-looking kid, fresh out of basic training, and said "left seat", and that's what you got trained as — unless you made a total hash of it and washed out.
Image
-"BB"-
Yes, I suppose I could agree with you ... but then we'd both be wrong, wouldn't we?

Countdown to the End of the Trump Administration
Image
Image
User avatar
Bicycle Bill
 
Posts: 4590
Joined: Thu Dec 03, 2015 1:10 pm
Location: Onalaska, Wi (suburb of La Crosse)

A local kid makes good

Postby RayThom » Sun May 05, 2019 4:57 am

Image

Chapter 17: INDIVIDUAL TRAINING OF FLYING PERSONNEL

Four weeks was the standard length of training at the replacement training centers until March 1942, when a nine-week course was instituted. Separate curricula were issued at that time for pilot and nonpilot training; the distinguishing feature of the latter curriculum was greater emphasis upon mathematics, target identification, photography, and meteorology. Until 1943 each preflight school exercised broad discretion in executing the prescribed program. The lack of uniform instruction proved a handicap in subsequent stages of aircrew training, and to correct this situation a single curriculum for all preflight students was published in April 1943. Final developments of the course were incorporated in a revision of May 1944, when the period of training was extended to ten weeks.

https://www.ibiblio.org/hyperwar/AAF/VI/AAF-VI-17.html
Image
“There is no great genius without a tincture of madness." Seneca 
User avatar
RayThom
 
Posts: 6750
Joined: Wed Mar 14, 2012 4:38 pm
Location: Longwood Gardens PA 19348

Re: A local kid makes good

Postby MGMcAnick » Sat May 11, 2019 9:53 pm

A LOT of them were quite young. No problem. I started my private pilot training just shy of my 18th birthday.. No particular trick in learning to fly. I know several people who I think are complete idiots who have licenses.

I just finished reading a short book called Brennen's Circus, The Plane Who Wouldn't Die. Lt Brennen was 21. He and his crew successfully completed their assigned 25, then 30, then 50 missions in a B-17. They limped "The Circus" back to friendly territory on two engines that should not have kept running. His son Michael, who was adopted by a man named Beech, wrote the book after exhaustive research long after his father died.
A friend of Doc's.
User avatar
MGMcAnick
 
Posts: 734
Joined: Mon Sep 28, 2015 10:01 pm
Location: 12 NM from ICT @ 010º


Return to Hardware

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest